Getting sober means quitting, quitting drinking. In the “can-do” and “rugged individualism” that seems part and parcel of American society, the idea of “quitting” often has other attendant psychological issues. Like, if you quit something, that means you were a failure. You didn’t do something successfully.

And, that can be seen as applying to the need for sobriety, too. A person “failed” at being a successful drinker. We even have semi-jokey stereotyped statements about people “not being able to handle their liquor” and similar.

The book, “Mastering the Art of Quitting” has nothing specific to sobriety. But, as a self-help book that isn’t overly laden with blind-rosy optimism, and that talks about goal strategies and similar ideas, a person embarking on the journey of sobriety can surely mine nuggets from this issue, not only about sobriety itself, but, for many people, earlier life issues that may have contributed to eventual addictive alcohol drinking or drug use.

The good points of this book are that it says we shouldn’t be afraid to quit something. Nor should we see shame or a sense of failure in doing so.

Personality factors that affect this, strategies for planning quitting, etc., all get discussed.