Category Archives: Keepers

Keeper of the Month – March

Lifering’s e-mail groups are active, thriving communities of people who use them as strong sources of sobriety support, and many members often post remarkably written sources of inspiration, hope and encouragement that many other group members call “Keepers” – posts that they save for themselves so they can go back and look at them as often as they like.

We here at LifeRing like sharing these posts, with the authors’ permission, on our Blog so that everyone can enjoy them as much as our group members do.

 

Keep Calm

 

In keeping with our recent “Essential Recovery Toolkit”, here is an example of what one delightful member of LifeRing’s list community, Angela Nolan, shared about emphasizing relaxation as part of her toolkit:

I am reading a book called (warning, cliche’ ahead!) “I Want to Change My Life:  How to Overcome Anxiety, Depression, and Addiction” by Stephen M. Melemis, Ph.D., M.D.  The first part of the book is all about learning to relax and using the breath and the body to relax the mind.  I have been doing some of the exercises daily and one of them is our own dear Jane’s deep belly breathing.  :)  Should’ve known.

Anyway, below is a quote from the book and I am finding it very helpful.  I’ve been through a lot, especially in the past few years, and my drinking didn’t help, but only extremely aggravated all of it.  I realize that one of my big problems/triggers is letting stress get to me and I have been through the most serious stress since the surgery.

I’ve been sober again two weeks (and finished the klonopin taper 3 days ago) and by practicing relaxation, I think I’ve made it a lot easier on myself.  Not only that, but I think if I keep these good practices going, they could lead me into the sobriety that is going to sustain me for the rest of my life.

Quote from the book:  

“When you are tense, you blur the line between what happens around you and what you feel inside. When you’re tense, it feels as if things are happening to you instead of happening around you. Therefore you try to control them. It feels like people are going out of their way to irritate. But when you’re relaxed, you see things as simply happening, which makes it easier to let them go. Learning to relax doesn’t make you passive. It is efficient . Mind-body relaxation doesn’t involve letting go of what’s important. You learn how to let go of what’s holding you back.”

Here’s to all of us letting go of what’s holding us back.

~~

 

 

The Essential Recovery Toolkit

Leonard Nimoy Quote 2

 

Hi Everyone,

Since I’ve been fiddling around while Rome burns (i.e. working very, very, slowly on new blog pieces), I’d like to direct you to a new page placed on our website today that, in my humble opinion, is truly the most remarkable collection of recovery toolkits I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading.

Made up of real tools contributed by LifeRing members, including links to LifeRing-related tools here at lifering.org, it’s the perfect starting place for newcomers, go-to for those in early recovery, and a great refresher for those long-timers who can use one.

Please have a look-see at it here:

LifeRing Recovery Toolkit

Enjoy!

:) Bobbi C.

Keeper of the Month – February

Lifering’s e-mail groups are active, thriving communities of people who use them as strong sources of sobriety support, and many members often post remarkably written sources of inspiration, hope and encouragement that many other group members call “Keepers” – posts that they save for themselves so they can go back and look at them as often as they like.

We here at LifeRing like sharing these posts, with the authors’ permission, on our Blog so that everyone can enjoy them as much as our group members do.

Nelson Mandela Quote

 

This month’s post is contributed by Mary C., who recently posted about her 2 year sobriety anniversary, how she’s gotten there (aka her “PRP”, or Personal Recovery Plan/Program), and all of the benefits she’s received by living a clean and sober life:

I am so pleased to be able to say I have two years sober as of today. I am doing a quiet little happy dance here on my iPad keyboard.

I’ve been trying for decades, literally, to shake this drinking obsession. And with support from a good addictions counselor and the wisdom of this group and F2F LR meetings, I finally, finally feel free of it. After two years I still do the various elements of my Personal Recovery Plan, but maybe not quite so intensely these days — my F2F LifeRing meetings are down to once a week, online reading and posting most days but not always, weekly visits to addictions counselor are now down to as-needed “tune-ups”.

I’m feeling physically and emotionally better than I have in years. The biggest danger now is getting complacent and slacking off on my program. For example, when I miss a week or two of F2F meetings, I can see a big red flag signaling caution, pay attention!

I know it can be so daunting and scary to quit. But keep trying, trying, trying. I’m sure I was lurking and occasionally posting on LR forums and email lists for at least two years, then I found my counselor and then started about six months of hard-work-therapy before pulling the trigger on my Quit Date of Feb 4.

Just for the record, let me briefly list the changes in my life that have come with sobriety in these last two years:

* My thoughts are now turned outward toward an interesting life instead of inward with guilt and secrecy and self hatred.
* Crazy good health improvements. Lost 52 lbs. (Weight Watchers). Normalized my high blood pressure. Reduced all those lab test markers for cholesterol, liver, blood sugar, etc.

* Sleep gets its own category because it’s so wonderful to have it back!  I still have to take the occasional Benadryl or melatonin, but those 3 am wide eyed hangover wake ups are gone for good. 

* This is a weird one:  I can enjoy music again. For years I wasn’t able to listen to much music because it provoked such an emotional response in me. Now that my emotions are better balanced, I have pulled out my old vinyl, bought a new turntable, transferred old iPod music to iPhone & am good to go!

* Like a lot of people in sobriety, I’ve found exercise. I now try to walk with my little dog Rosie every day in order to keep my mind happy and to sleep well.  (Plus Rosie likes it)

* Travel is something I can do again. I don’t have to stay home any more and nurse my addiction. Went to Santa Fe/Taos last fall and am heading to San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, this spring.

* Best for last, my dearest relationships with family and most friends are happier, more relaxed and somehow closer. Sadly, not all relationships fared so well, but I can’t really regret that.

 

Thanks for letting me share my milestone with you. I’ll still be here reading, even tho I’m not a very frequent poster. I can hardly go a day without looking in on LifeRing!

 ~~

Keeper of the Month – January

Lifering’s e-mail groups are active, thriving communities of people who use them as strong sources of sobriety support, and many members often post remarkably written sources of inspiration, hope and encouragement that many other group members call “Keepers” – posts that they save for themselves so they can go back and look at them as often as they like.

We here at LifeRing like sharing these posts, with the authors’ permission, on our Blog so that everyone can enjoy them as much as our group members do.

Strength Grows

 

 This month’s Keeper is contributed by a wise and wonderful long time LifeRing e-mail list member with over a dozen years of sobriety talking about what she does to keep herself on an even keel, while navigating a busy and sometimes stressful but rewarding life, during a discussion about avoiding relapse:

…the relapse talk is really useful to me. I think as we stay sober for longer we need another kind of maintenance perhaps, or maybe just to keep up the maintenance ?

I’m sober longer than I ever considered starting out. My life has changed so much. I’ve grown and become more competent, more brave, and in many ways more true to myself. I mean, I feel defeated by Ph.D rejections! But I always thought I would never even be capable or want to attempt it because I would then have to teach. Something I considered so terrifyingly beyond me, and I’m teaching and loving it. I forget sometimes to consider these kinds of things.

I move in new circles and I do often feel like a strong cool sober woman but also sometimes like a weird marginalized wanna be. Sometimes I embrace that and think it’s ok to not really fit in and other times I suffer.

If I don’t remember my drinking history and how terrible everything could get – I may start thinking I’m the kind of cool sober woman who can drink sometimes to take the pressure off, to fit in, to celebrate like those around me, or to hide away in my old hole of fear and pain.

It’s actually hard to navigate. I can do so much more now, but I am still a person who feels stress in ways that can really damage me and over things that surprise some people. On the other hand, I can live with some variations of chaos and pressure that others regard as impossible. I think because I remember how crazy it and I used to be.

It’s hard to be strong and fragile at the same time. But I think it’s often the case for people in recovery, and also it seems many tend to take on too much at once when we find we gain strength. I have done it so many times! But I have also done very little at times. It’s hard to balance too little and too much and I find I manage it better when I’m in touch with sober support. It helps me keep perspective – or at least get it back when I lose it.  :-?

Shit this is a ramble – I’m really worn out. I had exams this week and yesterday and today I’ve been feeling really tired but my head was spinning and I felt a little manic in my thoughts. Intense and speedy and exhausted. I got some time alone this evening and turned to Netflix – I feel like its safe to meet the world tomorrow. :)

~~~

Guest Blog: Badassery, By Dennis Meeks

This is our final blog post of 2014, and we’re proud as peacocks to present a special contribution chronicling a truly remarkable first year of sobriety, authored by our own fellow LifeRinger and blog supporter and frequent commenter Dennis Meeks. Our many thanks and heartfelt congratulations go out to Dennis, and here’s to another great New Year for us all!

Dennis’s medals cache, displayed on a walker incurred by developing a bone spur from all his badassery. ~ Photo Courtesy of Adalyn Meeks

 

BADASSERY

When I tell non-runners that I run marathons, the first question I get is “Why?”   And it’s a very good question.

I have always been running from something, most of us have I think.  Now I am running toward something, sobriety, but to get there I have to run through a ton of bullshit to get to the other side.  And I needed help to get there.

At the tender age of 63, after finally (hopefully) getting off the crazy-go-round of serial relapses that had been ongoing for 3 years, I decided I would run 6 marathons in 6 months.  The first 2 or 3 went well, so I upped it to 12.  But, then I thought, “What if I get injured and need some time off?” So I added one more, #13,  and just in case I had to skip one, I could still finish 12 in 12 months.

Running – now I am speaking literally; feet pounding the pavement running  – and getting sober are not that that dissimilar.  I’ve been running on and off for decades, but for the last several years, especially 2010 through 2013, my running was mostly off.

I started training again in July 2013 after quitting drink and drugs on June 29.  Some may think it borders on masochism to train for one marathon, and just plain craziness to train and run one every month for a year.  But, not so fast….I had been drinking myself senseless with alcohol for years,  so why not run myself sober?  I needed a goal to strengthen my sober resolve.

—–

Running became my go to therapy.  Running, hurting, growing,  and getting stronger with every training run and my self-confidence shining in the sweat of my contorted face at the finish line of every marathon.  It’s difficult to drink (like I drink when I drink) and exceed at anything other than resolute failure and regret.

So,  my first marathon time this year was a 4:23,  not bad for the aged among us.  I was stoked.  And 6 months later, I had a personal best at 4:22.  And I kept going.  Running.  Not drinking.  Repeat.  I ran in the rain, sleet, and the heat of the Tennessee summer, when I came to understand the splendid relief that shade trees and sobriety offer.  I ran when I didn’t want to run,  I ran when my feet hurt, when my calves cramped, when all I could do is put one foot in front of the other and I ran when I didn’t like myself and have kept running now that I have discovered that , hey, I’m not so bad, I’m actually a pretty good guy.   I have endured.  By god, that’s what I do, I endure.

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