Tag Archives: Sobriety

Kiss My Arse, I’m Irish

~~As posted on our Facebook page today~~

Happy St. Patrick’s Day, and a special “Hello” to our friends in Ireland!

In America, this is a wonderful day to celebrate all things Irish as well as our strong Irish heritages – did you know there are more people of Irish descent in the U.S. than there are in Ireland?

But it’s also accepted as a “drinking holiday” in which many, many imbibe with gusto…which can make it a rather difficult day for those of who don’t do that kind of thing anymore.

And you know what? That’s alright – better than alright, in fact! So, if you so choose, find fun AND healthy ways of the wearin’ o’ the green, and try to think of it this way:

 

But That's None of My Business

 

Take Good Care,

:) Bobbi C.

 

 

 

 

The Essential Recovery Toolkit

Leonard Nimoy Quote 2

 

Hi Everyone,

Since I’ve been fiddling around while Rome burns (i.e. working very, very, slowly on new blog pieces), I’d like to direct you to a new page placed on our website today that, in my humble opinion, is truly the most remarkable collection of recovery toolkits I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading.

Made up of real tools contributed by LifeRing members, including links to LifeRing-related tools here at lifering.org, it’s the perfect starting place for newcomers, go-to for those in early recovery, and a great refresher for those long-timers who can use one.

Please have a look-see at it here:

LifeRing Recovery Toolkit

Enjoy!

:) Bobbi C.

Keeper of the Month – February

Lifering’s e-mail groups are active, thriving communities of people who use them as strong sources of sobriety support, and many members often post remarkably written sources of inspiration, hope and encouragement that many other group members call “Keepers” – posts that they save for themselves so they can go back and look at them as often as they like.

We here at LifeRing like sharing these posts, with the authors’ permission, on our Blog so that everyone can enjoy them as much as our group members do.

Nelson Mandela Quote

 

This month’s post is contributed by Mary C., who recently posted about her 2 year sobriety anniversary, how she’s gotten there (aka her “PRP”, or Personal Recovery Plan/Program), and all of the benefits she’s received by living a clean and sober life:

I am so pleased to be able to say I have two years sober as of today. I am doing a quiet little happy dance here on my iPad keyboard.

I’ve been trying for decades, literally, to shake this drinking obsession. And with support from a good addictions counselor and the wisdom of this group and F2F LR meetings, I finally, finally feel free of it. After two years I still do the various elements of my Personal Recovery Plan, but maybe not quite so intensely these days — my F2F LifeRing meetings are down to once a week, online reading and posting most days but not always, weekly visits to addictions counselor are now down to as-needed “tune-ups”.

I’m feeling physically and emotionally better than I have in years. The biggest danger now is getting complacent and slacking off on my program. For example, when I miss a week or two of F2F meetings, I can see a big red flag signaling caution, pay attention!

I know it can be so daunting and scary to quit. But keep trying, trying, trying. I’m sure I was lurking and occasionally posting on LR forums and email lists for at least two years, then I found my counselor and then started about six months of hard-work-therapy before pulling the trigger on my Quit Date of Feb 4.

Just for the record, let me briefly list the changes in my life that have come with sobriety in these last two years:

* My thoughts are now turned outward toward an interesting life instead of inward with guilt and secrecy and self hatred.
* Crazy good health improvements. Lost 52 lbs. (Weight Watchers). Normalized my high blood pressure. Reduced all those lab test markers for cholesterol, liver, blood sugar, etc.

* Sleep gets its own category because it’s so wonderful to have it back!  I still have to take the occasional Benadryl or melatonin, but those 3 am wide eyed hangover wake ups are gone for good. 

* This is a weird one:  I can enjoy music again. For years I wasn’t able to listen to much music because it provoked such an emotional response in me. Now that my emotions are better balanced, I have pulled out my old vinyl, bought a new turntable, transferred old iPod music to iPhone & am good to go!

* Like a lot of people in sobriety, I’ve found exercise. I now try to walk with my little dog Rosie every day in order to keep my mind happy and to sleep well.  (Plus Rosie likes it)

* Travel is something I can do again. I don’t have to stay home any more and nurse my addiction. Went to Santa Fe/Taos last fall and am heading to San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, this spring.

* Best for last, my dearest relationships with family and most friends are happier, more relaxed and somehow closer. Sadly, not all relationships fared so well, but I can’t really regret that.

 

Thanks for letting me share my milestone with you. I’ll still be here reading, even tho I’m not a very frequent poster. I can hardly go a day without looking in on LifeRing!

 ~~

Overcoming an old taboo — let’s talk about suicide

Many recovering alcoholics or addicts may have a suicide attempt in their pasts, either while clean and sober or else while under the influence. In years past, it was considered taboo to have survivors talk about their attempts, for fear this might be a trigger. In fact, aside from talking, survivors often were shunned.

Now, the nation’s leading organization of counselors, the American Academy of Suicidology, thinks it’s time to change all of this. Other organizations are thinking the same, it seems:

“We as a field need to hear these stories,” said John Draper, director of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, “and not just to study them but to ask how they found a way to cope and connect: What did family and friends and doctors do that helped, and what did not?”

Lifering is a volunteer-based organization, above all in its convenors of its meetings. We are not professional counselors. However, if you are in recovery, and have a suicide attempt as part of your past, we encourage you to work with a counselor who is aware of the latest professional discussion on counseling in this area. And, as always, we encourage you to do whatever works best for  you to maintain and strengthen your sobriety.

The psychology of quitting, and quitting drinking

Getting sober means quitting, quitting drinking. In the “can-do” and “rugged individualism” that seems part and parcel of American society, the idea of “quitting” often has other attendant psychological issues. Like, if you quit something, that means you were a failure. You didn’t do something successfully.

And, that can be seen as applying to the need for sobriety, too. A person “failed” at being a successful drinker. We even have semi-jokey stereotyped statements about people “not being able to handle their liquor” and similar.

The book, “Mastering the Art of Quitting” has nothing specific to sobriety. But, as a self-help book that isn’t overly laden with blind-rosy optimism, and that talks about goal strategies and similar ideas, a person embarking on the journey of sobriety can surely mine nuggets from this issue, not only about sobriety itself, but, for many people, earlier life issues that may have contributed to eventual addictive alcohol drinking or drug use.

The good points of this book are that it says we shouldn’t be afraid to quit something. Nor should we see shame or a sense of failure in doing so.

Personality factors that affect this, strategies for planning quitting, etc., all get discussed.