Tag Archives: tools

Keeper of the Month – March

Lifering’s e-mail groups are active, thriving communities of people who use them as strong sources of sobriety support, and many members often post remarkably written sources of inspiration, hope and encouragement that many other group members call “Keepers” – posts that they save for themselves so they can go back and look at them as often as they like.

We here at LifeRing like sharing these posts, with the authors’ permission, on our Blog so that everyone can enjoy them as much as our group members do.

 

Keep Calm

 

In keeping with our recent “Essential Recovery Toolkit”, here is an example of what one delightful member of LifeRing’s list community, Angela Nolan, shared about emphasizing relaxation as part of her toolkit:

I am reading a book called (warning, cliche’ ahead!) “I Want to Change My Life:  How to Overcome Anxiety, Depression, and Addiction” by Stephen M. Melemis, Ph.D., M.D.  The first part of the book is all about learning to relax and using the breath and the body to relax the mind.  I have been doing some of the exercises daily and one of them is our own dear Jane’s deep belly breathing.  :)  Should’ve known.

Anyway, below is a quote from the book and I am finding it very helpful.  I’ve been through a lot, especially in the past few years, and my drinking didn’t help, but only extremely aggravated all of it.  I realize that one of my big problems/triggers is letting stress get to me and I have been through the most serious stress since the surgery.

I’ve been sober again two weeks (and finished the klonopin taper 3 days ago) and by practicing relaxation, I think I’ve made it a lot easier on myself.  Not only that, but I think if I keep these good practices going, they could lead me into the sobriety that is going to sustain me for the rest of my life.

Quote from the book:  

“When you are tense, you blur the line between what happens around you and what you feel inside. When you’re tense, it feels as if things are happening to you instead of happening around you. Therefore you try to control them. It feels like people are going out of their way to irritate. But when you’re relaxed, you see things as simply happening, which makes it easier to let them go. Learning to relax doesn’t make you passive. It is efficient . Mind-body relaxation doesn’t involve letting go of what’s important. You learn how to let go of what’s holding you back.”

Here’s to all of us letting go of what’s holding us back.

~~

 

 

Kiss My Arse, I’m Irish

~~As posted on our Facebook page today~~

Happy St. Patrick’s Day, and a special “Hello” to our friends in Ireland!

In America, this is a wonderful day to celebrate all things Irish as well as our strong Irish heritages – did you know there are more people of Irish descent in the U.S. than there are in Ireland?

But it’s also accepted as a “drinking holiday” in which many, many imbibe with gusto…which can make it a rather difficult day for those of who don’t do that kind of thing anymore.

And you know what? That’s alright – better than alright, in fact! So, if you so choose, find fun AND healthy ways of the wearin’ o’ the green, and try to think of it this way:

 

But That's None of My Business

 

Take Good Care,

:) Bobbi C.

 

 

 

 

The Essential Recovery Toolkit

Leonard Nimoy Quote 2

 

Hi Everyone,

Since I’ve been fiddling around while Rome burns (i.e. working very, very, slowly on new blog pieces), I’d like to direct you to a new page placed on our website today that, in my humble opinion, is truly the most remarkable collection of recovery toolkits I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading.

Made up of real tools contributed by LifeRing members, including links to LifeRing-related tools here at lifering.org, it’s the perfect starting place for newcomers, go-to for those in early recovery, and a great refresher for those long-timers who can use one.

Please have a look-see at it here:

LifeRing Recovery Toolkit

Enjoy!

:) Bobbi C.

Linkapalooza!

Here’s a few links to some interesting articles on the web ~ have a look-see if you need something to help keep you occupied this weekend, and have a good one!

Even if Christmas and the last year are over, this is still a great list of books:

http://ideas.ted.com/2014/12/16/books-worth-reading-this-holiday-recommended-by-bill-gates-susan-cain-and-more/

Like to cook but find so many recipes call for alcohol? Here’s a fabulous list of substitutions you can use instead:

http://whatscookingamerica.net/alcoholsub.htm

Are you a Highly-Sensitive Person (HSP)?

http://reset.me/story/highly-sensitive-person-need-know-science-personality-type/

This one’s been all over the web for the past coupla weeks, but in case you haven’t seen it, here you go:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/07/health/alcohol-poisoning-kills-6-americans-a-day-federal-report-finds.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=second-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=1

And last but not least -holy crap, I got the “MacArthur Genius Grant”:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/leonoraepstein/what-major-award-should-you-get#.ppPPZjpJP

~~~

 

 

 

New Edition of Recovery by Choice Workbook

After a great deal of work by its author, Martin Nicolaus, LifeRing is pleased to announce the release of the new 4th edition of “Recovery by Choice: Living and Enjoying Life Free of Alcohol and Other Drugs — a Workbook.” The book is available at the LifeRing store by clicking here.

The new edition moves further away from what the author describes as the “conventional literary divisions called … chapters.” Instead, the Workbook is divided into “domains,” a change which “highlights the three-dimensional framework of the recovery process.” This points up the fact that the Workbook does not have a traditional beginning or end, beyond the introductory remarks. Instead, the user can delve into the domains in any order desired. Whether it’s “My Body” or “My Feelings” or “My Life Style”, readers can deal with the issues that are most urgent to them.

The changes in labeling, while important, do nothing to “diminish the choice-based structure of the work” as it has existed in earlier editions. Nicolaus writes in the Preface to the new edition: “People in this book remain individuals, not widgets. People can still start anywhere they choose, and they can enter and leave the domains in any order that works for them. They can determine which domains apply to them deeply, or only somewhat, or not at all.”

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